Matching Principle Definition:

The Matching principle is a fundamental accounting principle that requires a company to record expenses in the same period as the related revenues. The Matching principle is based on the idea that a company should only report income and expenses in the same accounting period in which they were incurred, regardless of when payment was made or received.

The Matching principle is often used to determine the appropriate time to recognize revenue and expenses in a company’s financial statements. For example, if a company sells a product or service on credit, the Matching principle requires the company to recognize the revenue when the product is delivered or the service is performed, rather than when the customer pays for it. This helps to ensure that the company’s financial statements accurately reflect the economic reality of the business rather than just the timing of cash flows.

From the above Matching principle definition, it is clear that it is an important part of the accrual basis of accounting and bookkeeping service, which is based on the idea that financial events should be recorded in the period in which they occur, rather than just when cash is received or paid out.

This approach through the Matching principle definition, provides a more accurate and complete picture of a company’s financial performance and position, as it takes into account all economic events that have occurred during a given period, rather than just those that involve cash.

The Matching Principle is Important for Several Reasons:

  1. It helps to provide a more accurate and complete picture of a company’s financial performance and position. By matching revenues and expenses in the same accounting period, the company’s financial statements reflect the economic reality of the business, rather than just the timing of cash flows.
  2. It ensures that a company’s income statement accurately reflects its profitability. The income statement includes both revenue and expenses, and the matching principle ensures that these two items are properly matched and reported in the same accounting period. This helps investors and other stakeholders understand the company’s profitability and how well it is managing its expenses.
  3. It helps to ensure the reliability and comparability of financial statements. By following the matching principle, companies can present their financial statements in a consistent and transparent manner, which helps to ensure that they can be compared to the financial statements of other companies.
  4. It helps to support informed decision-making. By providing a more accurate and complete picture of a company’s financial performance and position, the matching principle helps investors, creditors, and other stakeholders make informed decisions about the company.
  5. It helps to support the integrity and credibility of financial statements. By following the matching principle, companies can demonstrate that their financial statements are based on accurate and reliable information, which helps to build trust and confidence in their financial reporting.

Meru Accounting, a CPA firm, offers small and medium-sized businesses in the United States, United Kingdom, Australia, New Zealand, Hong Kong, Canada, and Europe outsourced bookkeeping and accounting solutions.


This will close in 0 seconds

    Please Submit Your Email

    This will close in 21 seconds

      Request Call Back

      This will close in 0 seconds

      Meru Accounting

      First Month Bookkeeping Free !

        Contact Us

        This will close in 0 seconds